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At what age are our legs strongest?

18 to 45.

As we grow older, our skeletal muscles tend to wither and weaken, a phenomenon known as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia, which begins to appear at around age 40 and accelerates after 75, is a major cause of disability in the elderly.

Sarcopenia With Aging IN THIS ARTICLE Symptoms and Causes of Sarcopenia Treatments for Sarcopenia From the time you are born to around the time you turn 30, your muscles grow larger and stronger. But at some point in your 30s, you start to lose muscle mass and function. The cause is age-related sarcopenia or sarcopenia with aging. Physically inactive people can lose as much as 3% to 5% of their muscle mass each decade after age 30. Even if you are active, you’ll still have some muscle loss. There’s no test or specific level of muscle mass that will diagnose sarcopenia. Any loss of muscle matters because it lessens strength and mobility. Sarcopenia typically happens faster around age 75. But it may also speed up as early as 65 or as late as 80. It’s a factor in frailty and the likelihood of falls and fractures in older adults. Symptoms and Causes of Sarcopenia Symptoms can include weakness and loss of stamina, which can interfere with physical activity. Reduced activity further shrinks muscle mass. Although sarcopenia is seen mostly in people who are inactive, the fact that it also occurs in people who stay physically active suggests there are other factors in its development. Researchers believe these include: CONTINUE READING BELOW Reduction in nerve cells responsible for sending signals from the brain to the muscles to start movement Lower concentrations of some hormones, including growth hormone, testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor A decrease in the ability to turn protein into energy Not getting enough calories or protein each day to sustain muscle mass Treatments for Sarcopenia The primary treatment for sarcopenia is exercise, specifically resistance training or strength training. These activities increase muscle strength and endurance using weights or resistance bands. Resistance training can help your neuromuscular system, hormones. It also can improve an older adult’s ability to convert protein to energy in as little as two weeks. The proper number, intensity, and frequency of resistance exercise is important for getting the most benefit with the least risk of injury. You should work with an experienced physical therapist or trainer to develop an exercise plan. Although medication is not the preferred treatment for sarcopenia, a few are being studied. They include: Urocortin II. This can prevent muscle atrophy that can happen when you’re in a cast or taking certain medicines. Its use for building muscle mass in humans has not been studied and isn’t recommended. Testosterone supplements Growth hormone supplements Medication for treatment of metabolic syndrome (including, insulin-resistance, obesity, and hypertension) If these prove useful, you’ll use them with resistance exercise, not instead of it.

Most people become weaker in their later years, as their leg muscles get smaller and less able to bear weight, which often leads to disability and falls. But until now, nobody has known why the process happens or if it can be reversed. However, scientists at Manchester Metropolitan University have discovered that by the age of 75, people have between 30 and 50 per cent fewer nerves controlling the muscles in their legs. This leaves large areas of the muscle disconnected from the nervous system – which acts as an electricity supply and communication link to the brain. Without the connection the muscle areas wither away and die. Dr Mathew Piasecki, the study lead author who has since taken up a position at the University of Nottingham, said: “One of the earliest attempts at research similar to ours showed results from a small group of older people who apparently had just a couple of surviving nerves feeding into a foot muscle. “We were very sceptical of the old data, however, now that we have tested a couple of hundred men we think the early observation was probably correct. We have also observed some very old muscles with just a few dozen nerves left, where young and healthy adults have hundreds.”(Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/03/12/inevitable-muscle-wasting-old-age-could-stopped-scientists-believe/ – very good source, can give a link too)

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